Thursday, June 17, 2004

Community Colleges

HANAH METCHIS, HIT & RUN - Those of us who went to elite four-year colleges and universities are prone to forget that most people don't. In the Washington Post, a community college professor writes about the differences between the experience her community college students are having on the one hand, and the experience her daughter had at an elite college on the other:
You go to community college because you are an ambitious kid whose parents don't have professional jobs. Because you are a girl in a family whose culture for thousands of years has valued education only for boys. Because you come from a family that never really thought about college for anyone, never saved for it or steered you toward it. You go to community college because you had a significant trauma during your adolescence: Perhaps you had an alcoholic parent, lost a sibling, lived in a household of chronic anger, suffered from depression or anorexia, did too many drugs. So you failed some of your high school courses, and the "good" colleges won't take you. You go to community college because you were born in another country and came to America too late to pick up English very easily. Because you landed a good job or gave birth to a beautiful baby right out of high school, and didn't look back for 10 or 15 years, when, suddenly, you thought about college. You go to community college because you have a learning disability, undiagnosed or untreated, that pushed you to the sidelines in school. Because you started at a four-year school and discovered that you weren't ready to leave home. And you go to community college because you believe that America is a society where intelligence is rewarded, and since you're such a fine, intelligent person, it's unnecessary for you to actually do any homework in high school, and suddenly you have a C average and your SATs are pretty good but, frankly, so are a lot of other people's, and the best offer you got from four-year colleges was their wait list.
Very interesting, and worth reading the whole thing.

2 Comments:

At 5:08 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Lucas,
Thank you for sharing this article. I read the entire thing with the link and really enjoyed it. Both of my parents went to community college and I think people should respect it more. It's given me more insight to their education and mine.
Sarah....I can't fiqure out how to sign up without a blog myself.

 
At 6:43 PM, Blogger Luke said...

I'm glad you liked it. You can either post comments anonymously and just sign your name at the end--like you did here--which is easy, or you can register a name (and if you want, create your own blog).

 

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